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thenextweb:

(via Apple maintains 70% grip on China’s tablet market, as industry sales jump 63% year-on-year - The Next Web)

This is why Apple hasn’t hit the market cap ceiling yet.  Even though American sales may be unimpressive compared to past performance (impressive compared to everyone else lol) they still have a massive market in China eager to gobble up iphones and ipads.  
This becomes wildly relevant because China’s ‘copper wire’ infrastructure will never keep up with demand to connect to the internet.  Already China’s mobile internet usage is exploding past traditional hard lines.
"China will jump ahead of the U.S. this year to be the world’s largest smartphone market by volume, according to IDC’s latest market figures released last Thursday. IDC expects China to increase its share of the growing smartphone market by over 800 basis points y-o-y to about 26.5% by the end of 2012, pushing U.S.’ market share down to below 18%.”  Read more. High-res

thenextweb:

(via Apple maintains 70% grip on China’s tablet market, as industry sales jump 63% year-on-year - The Next Web)

This is why Apple hasn’t hit the market cap ceiling yet.  Even though American sales may be unimpressive compared to past performance (impressive compared to everyone else lol) they still have a massive market in China eager to gobble up iphones and ipads.  

This becomes wildly relevant because China’s ‘copper wire’ infrastructure will never keep up with demand to connect to the internet.  Already China’s mobile internet usage is exploding past traditional hard lines.

"China will jump ahead of the U.S. this year to be the world’s largest smartphone market by volume, according to IDC’s latest market figures released last Thursday. IDC expects China to increase its share of the growing smartphone market by over 800 basis points y-o-y to about 26.5% by the end of 2012, pushing U.S.’ market share down to below 18%.”  Read more.

stoweboyd:

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.
High-res

stoweboyd:

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

  • Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
  • Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

(via thenextweb)

Google Search

Source: Google

Googlemay be on its way out as the dominant player in search, according to one analyst — and could even “disappear” in as little as five to eight years if the competitive pressures that ultimately claimed other search giants start to take root.

In the wake of a surprisingly weak earnings report, Eric Jackson, Ironfire capital founder and managing member, said Google could easily find itself fending off the woes that eventually took hold at embattled Yahoo!.

"They could disappear in five to eight years and disappear in the sense thatYahoo used to be the king of search. Now, for all intents and purposes, Yahoo has disappeared,” Jackson said Thursday on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street”.

Social Optimization tries to become Big Business but not unless Facebook Gets Mobile together Quick.

"There’s a staggering new statistic in Facebook’s 10-Q SEC document today: 102 million people accessed Facebook solely from mobile in June, a massive 23% increase over the 83 million mobile-only users in March. 18.7% of its 543 million monthly mobile users don’t even visit its desktop site. That means if it can’t make its mobile advertising generate a lot more money within the next year, revenue could plummet like its stock price, down 6.2% today to $21.71.”

read more from techcrunch or check this:

Social optimization is trying to become big business. Take wetpaint.com, they built their business around a “proprietary Social Distribution System, a patent-pending technology-based social experimentation platform.”  Their whole sales pitch basically boils down to successful curation of their flagship entertainment site through social media (primarily Facebook).  Here is a company asking other companies to trust that they’ve found the special social sauce to effectively drive maximum traffic to any website using Facebook.

Do you see the problem yet?  It’s the same problem hammering down on Facebook: How do you monetize social traffic especially when more and more of it is mobile?  Companies like wetpaint.com can undoubtedly drive massive amounts of visits but will those people actually engage with advertising and content on your site?  Once they find and like your site through Facebook will they come back and through which screen? The questions of if social optimization sites are worth partnering with become even more complex when you look at how Facebook mobile usage continues to balloon.

If I’m still on Facebook in 10 years, kill me.

The new era of digital commerce and consumer engagement with traditional television

It’s been a good great week for media and advertising junkies.  A flurry of recent reports, studies, and industry ponderings shed more light on consumer engagement with advertising across all four screens.  I’m going to try to sum some of these finding up as they relate to my favorite screen: TV.  Specifically I make the case that today’s market is primed for an explosion of a new wave of commerce that’s not just m-commerce or t-commerce, but a combination of the two.  There’s never been such positive rapid change in consumer engagement behavior around television and advertising in general.  After all digital marketers saw the demise of the click-through rate, the rise of fragmentation, and ultimately a monopolization of consumer time on social media.  Before anyone can blink we’re taking all that and going mobile.  Hello web3.0 or should I just call it MobileWeb.  Through all this change television remains basically unchanged.  For the most part old faithful still runs on a barely measurable, one to many, push content model.  With this week’s series of studies, the advertising industry finally has direction into the future of engaging with audiences, and the answer comes from consumers themselves.

Let’s begin with our good friends at the IAB.  According to a new study by the Interactive Advertising Bureau “nearly half (47%) of tablet owners and a quarter of smartphone users interact with ads on their devices at least once a week.”  What’s better than that you ask?  Another recent study, this time from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, finds that half of all cellphone owners use their phones while watching television.  Boom.  While the IAB states tells us that these increases in mobile usage harm traditional media, Pew strikes back finding that “television audiences are primed to participate” using mobile “mission critical” tools.  According to their study, “23% used their phones to text someone who is watching the same show; 22% used the phone to visit a website mentioned on TV (either in the programming or ads); 11% surfed the Web to see what others were saying online about the show — the same percentage said they posted their own online comments about it — and 6% said they sometimes used the phone to vote for a reality show contestant.”  Personally I feel that consumers consume more content across all technologies.  They’re adding more screens not replacing them.  Their screen combination may vary depending on time of day, location within the home, and main focus at that time.  Here are three scenarios off the bat:

  • Sandy is sitting at home on the couch with the TV on.  She’s watching reality TV but not actively engaged in the show (or paying attention to ads) because she busy blogging about why her favorite bachelor just got kicked off.
  • Mark however is totally engaged with the Dancing With The Stars finale.  He’s so excited that during the show (and during commercials) he’s sharing every ounce of this excitement on Twitter and Facebook with the rest of the audience.
  • John loves The Walking Dead.  It’s felt like 2 years since last week’s episode and now he’s finally watching zombies in all their glory.  During commercial breaks however he dives into his phone to search for weird zombie stuff online while TV commercials play out.

Here are three very different examples of video consumption across multiple screens with one common denominator: content on the television screen.  The IAB and Pew both point in the same direction, mobile no longer really means “one the go,” and more importantly that mobile users aren’t waiting around for traditional TV to catch up with their desire for on-screen interactivity.

Another wrinkle in the television landscape are connected/smart TV’s.  This year, DailyMediaNews reports that “56% of smart TV set owners have accessed some video via a Net connection, according to media research firm Parks Associates. The number is up from 40% two years ago. Overall, Internet-connected video watching on big TV screens is up 30% in the last six months.”  There it is again, our common denominator is still traditional tv… maybe I should have been calling it ‘the big screen’ all along.

Anyway, the point is that no matter how you access video content in the home, chances are television is involved at some level. Television remains the one screen to rule them all.  Traditional television companies need to stop fearing the other screens and learn to work with them, consumers already are.  For all the complexity in today’s advertising world the key to next generation of television advertising engagement lies somewhere between t-commerce and m-commerce, straight set-top-box driven television marketplaces and mobile second screen experiences.

Really don’t like the title of this article, it’s misleading and way too finite.  Consumers have no idea how they want to consume media, just ask any ‘second screen’ app company out there.  Also 60+ years of TV viewing habits (aka The Couch Potato) don’t just disappear overnight.  This and fragmentation on screens and through software makes video habits impossible to nail down. Consumers download, subscribe, tune in, once then get distracted by someone else pitching the next best software.  Right now it’s all about convenience so all the rest of us can do it just hope we have the right technology at the right time to get them the content they want in a particular situation.

The author writes in regards to mobile,

“Being on-the-go no longer hinders their ability to consume media. Quite often they have a touch screen, which further enhances interactive communication and opens up a two-way channel for instant feedback and discussion.”

This is all fine except what if consumers are consuming mobile video in bed or in the bathtub and not on the go.  What if the iPad replaced their kitchen set-top-box?  I don’t have the answers, all i’m saying is be wary of finite headlines.  Don’t let them pollute your head as things are much more complicated than they seem.

Multi-Screen Media Usage

brianmcclary:

A few takeaways:
- More than 80% of respondents reported watching video on a computer (84%) or on television (83%)
- 74% of Asia Pacific and 72% of Middle Eastern / African respondents watch video on mobile phones once a month (almost 40% watch content on their device daily)

Chalk this one up to Nielsen’s blog.  This site is proving to be a valuable resource to anyone looking for some great digital articles.  Check out the blog here http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/

While there are a million applications for sensor apps in almost every industry the most impactful are the ones that can change the way we live.  Technologies that affect day to day life, communication, and culture can easily overcome many barriers to entry as early adopters and influencers begin using them.  Specifically I think connected devices will find immediate success in the home, the connected home.

My prediction for this immediate future is centered on the television.  That big main screen in your living room isn’t going anywhere; in fact, I think it’s going to become even more central to the rest of your home environment.  Apple is best positioned to take over this space since it’s walled garden approach has helped it create seamless links between it’s different devices.  The only thing missing of course is the Apple TV.

PCmag.com reports that Apple’s 3rd screen probably won’t be released in 2012 unless they overcome “market challenges with a TV set unless it implemented “a radical change of the user interface, integration of the TV programming and data content, and use of gesture or voice control.””

Maybe that radical shift is new focus on the connected home.  Think Siri meets your TV.  You can talk to your home (via your TV) the way you currently talk to Siri.  You can ask her what’s for dinner and after inventorying your fridge and checking out your favorite dished she makes some recommendations.  Or if you’re missing ingredients she will place your order for you with FreshDirect so that you are fully restocked.  This may seem a little far away but we’re already seeing internet connected fridges

My vision is only one variation of the connected home.  Perhaps it won’t be the Apple TV but the Xbox that brings our homes to life (you still need a TV though :D).  And while the TV may be the ‘one ring to rule them all’ perhaps it is remote home security or connected thermostates that make the first serious dent in this very exciting market.

In the last six months we’ve witnessed many magazine CMR firsts—the first ever report for Popular Science, the first epicurean CMR for Fine Cooking, and now, the first weekly magazine CMR for The Economist.

As we continue to watch the steady demise of physical print media at the unapologetic hand of the internet, mobile media is proving to be a source of intense growth and opportunity for publishers.  Not all print media is created equal however since magazine subscribership remains resilient while newspaper circulation continues down its dark downward spiral.  Without finding ways to quickly increase circulation magazine publishers face an uphill battle of lower advertising revenue coupled with rising talent, production, and material costs.  It is now clear that mobile (not Web 3.0, if that is even a reality anymore) is the knight in shining armor breathing new life into an otherwise stagnant medium.

View the Popular Science CMR

Smart phone and tablets power one of the fastest growth spurts magazine publishers have seen in recent memory.  Publications like The Economist and Popular Science Magazine who actively embrace mobile with beautiful and user friendly apps are reaping the rewards with massive mobile subscription growth.  They’re extending reach and providing immense value to consumers who want instant news, articles, and scientific research on the go.  In return readers are shelling out real dollars for single issues and subscriptions instead of relying solely on free content from social media.

Reports like ABC’s Consolidated Media Report bring a whole new level of insight to publishers and their advertisers.  Making sense of the flood of data generated by mobile and integrating it into cross platform media buys is the only way to access and take advantage of a consumer’s media usage pie.  The keys to the future exist within data and those that can generate and make decisions off of it will be the most successful.  These insights are becoming increasingly more important as advertisers continue to push ROI campaigns goals and are being held even more accountable for their marketing spends.  It’s a pleasure to finally welcome print into the age of measurement and accountability. 

cus