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3-D Printers Offer New Frontier for Artists

txchnologist:

by Michael Keller

Over the last few weeks, we’ve been talking a lot about all the possibilities inherent in 3-D printing. And the technology’s potential future is tantalizing: hospitals printing bespoke organs to fit transplant patients, the military and manufacturers solving design problems on the fly and smart machines making their own offspring, to name just a few.

But one area we haven’t looked at yet where 3-D printing is already making its mark is in the art world. A tribe of technophile artists is embracing 3-D printing for its ability to make intricate, complex shapes with seemingly impossible angles and undulating curves. And who knows? Maybe, like in Apple’s successful product creation formula where design meets engineering, some of these artists’ bright ideas will help the technology advance.

Here are just a few samples of 3-D printed work that have caught our eye.

(Top Image: 3-D printed lamps by Nervous System on display at the 2012 International Contemporary Furniture Fair. Photo courtesy Nervous System.)

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reuters:

Oscar Pistorius of South Africa trains before the men’s 400 meters event at the 23rd International Athletics Meeting in Lignano Sabbiadoro July 17, 2012. 
After striving to qualify for the 400 metres at the London Olympics for six years, Oscar Pistorius believes he will now be better placed to run at the Rio de Janeiro Games in 2016. 
The South African, who wears carbon fibre blades, will become the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics. REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo 
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reuters:

Oscar Pistorius of South Africa trains before the men’s 400 meters event at the 23rd International Athletics Meeting in Lignano Sabbiadoro July 17, 2012. 

After striving to qualify for the 400 metres at the London Olympics for six years, Oscar Pistorius believes he will now be better placed to run at the Rio de Janeiro Games in 2016. 

The South African, who wears carbon fibre blades, will become the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics. REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo 

Reuters Olympics | On Facebook | On iOS

“Traditionally watching TV or a video has been a ‘lean back’ experience, which means people passively view a TV show or movie,” Condition One COO Andrew Chang tells Co.Design. “Video is becoming a ‘lean forward’ experience. … We’re pushing forward that concept by allowing viewers to change their perspective of what they’re seeing, not just passively accepting the viewpoint of the director.”

Some of my favs:

8. Never, ever burn bridges. You may despise certain folks at college or on an internship, but thanks to karma and coincidence those connections will come in handy further along your career.

13. Go out for drinks with friends, even when you don’t want to. Your dream job isn’t going to fly through your bedroom window. Chances are it’s coming from one of your friends.

21. Do take control of your digital footprint. Blog. Set up a LinkedIn page. Lock down the Twitter account for your name. Make sure the majority of the content that pops up when someone Googles you is content you create and control.

23. Learn how to program. Even if you skipped any class that involved numbers in college, you should still be able to pick up the basics of a scripting language like Python. Programming ability will make your work easier, and it’ll also help you understand the way the world around you works. Code Academy is a place to start.

24. Read. Read as much as you can. It will make you a better writer, a better speaker, and more interesting.

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